Nathalie
Roelens

Prof. Dr. Nathalie Roelens is professor in literary theory at the University of Luxembourg and member of the research unit "Identities, Politics, Societies, Spaces". She worked as a lecturer or a visiting professor in several universities (Antwerp, Louvain, Gand, Nijmegen).

At the University of Luxembourg, she is course director of the Master in Secondary Education, (French section). She has also been the spokesperson of the Key research Area (MIS: Migration and Intercultural Studies) for three years (2016-2018). Her recent works focus on travel literature, geocriticism and urban semiotics.

She published amongst other:

  • Le lecteur, ce voyeur absolu (1998), 433 p.,
  • Éloge du dépaysement. Du voyage au tourisme (2015), 238 p.

She edited or coedited the collectives:

  • Jacques Derrida et l'esthétique (2000),119 p.,
  • Homo orthopedicus (2001), 525 p.,
  • L'imaginaire de l'écran (2004), 264 p.,
  • Lire, écrire, pratiquer la ville (2016), 364 p.,
  • Visages. Histoires, représentations, créations, (2017) 410 p.,
  • Das Paradigma der Interkulturalität. Themen und Positionen in europäischen Literaturwissenschaften (2017), 197 p. 
  • Chorographies. La mise en discours de la ville (2017), 94 p.,
  • La sémiotique en interface (2018), 690 p., La sémiotique et son autre (2019), 654 p.

She is member of the international partnership Erasmus+ "Reading in Europe Today" http://lea.letras.ulisboa.pt and member of IAWIS (International Associate for Word & Image Studies) whose next triennial conference she will organize at the University of Luxembourg, entitled "Sea and Water in Word and Image" (5th-10th July 2020).
See https://waterandsea2020.uni.lu

 

Research interests
Geocriticism
Word and Image
Urban Semiotics
Water and Sea
Contemporary Philosophy
Reading Theories

Latest content Nathalie Roelens took part in

Humanities
Water and Sea in Word and Image
Organised by the University of Luxembourg, the 12th International IAWIS/AIERTI Conference (12-16 July 2021) took place online and gathered more than two hundred participants from five continents.
Humanities
Reading and Writing Literary Texts in the Age of Digital Humanities
The omnipresence of the image in our society distances us from reading and all its benefits. Thirteen partners in the LEA! group are relying on digital technology to encourage young people to return to reading and discover the cultural references that are essential to education and development.
Orbilu