Robin
Samuel

I am interested in social inequality, work, health, well-being, sustainability, and research methods.

Most of my research involves the collection and statistical analysis of big data sets. In some projects, I employ experimental designs and qualitative methods as well.

Apart from my substantive interests, I currently examine the suitability of statistical models to investigate social inequalities in a range of health outcomes. My other methodological research is on validity in experimental designs and the application of Bayesian statistics in social research and beyond.

I joined the University of Luxembourg as an Associate Professor in 2016. Since 2020, I am Head of the Centre for Childhood and Youth Research.

Some ongoing funded research projects:

  • Young People and COVID-19: Social, Economic, and Health Consequences of Infection Prevention and Control Measures among Young People in Luxembourg (YAC+), 2020-2021, (PI).
  • Social Mobility and Inequalities in Health. Patterns of Intra- and Intergenerational Dynamics, 2018–2022, (PI).
  • An Analysis of Measures Addressing Young People in Challenging Transitions, 2018–2020, (PI).
  • Health and Well-Being of Young People in Luxembourg, 2018–2021, (Co-PI).
  • Employability among Young People in Luxembourg, 2017–2021, (PI).
  • Employers’ Hiring Decisions in Relation to Young People, 2017–2021, (PI).
  • Luxembourg Youth Survey, 2016–2025, (PI).

 

Research interests
Social Inequality
Work
Health
Sustainability
Well-Being
Research Methods

Latest content Robin Samuel took part in

Virtual Faculty
Preparing for the post-pandemic challenges
From the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the humanities and social sciences took a strong interest in this health crisis. While a lot of projects are examining the management and impact of the pandemic on our current lives, one of them wishes to look further. "Young People and COVID-19 - Social, Economic, and Health Consequences of Infection Prevention and Control Measures for Young People in Luxembourg", aims to monitor the short-term and long-term impact of the crisis on the 16-29 years old in Luxembourg.
Social Sciences
Monitoring the pulse of youth
Developed by the Centre for Childhood and Youth Research, the Youth Survey Luxembourg collects data on different aspects of the lives of young people aged 16 to 29 every 5 years .The findings help policy-makers in their decisions as well as researchers.
Orbilu