Migration

Global migration has a strong impact on societies and is the subject of intensive research. Research into migration at the University of Luxembourg seeks to understand how to foster inclusiveness in what the UN has called the “age of migration”. Driven by the conviction that the causes and effects of migration can only be understood if we look simultaneously at the way commodities, texts and artefacts, media content, etc., move and thereby influence migratory processes, research systematically relates the migration of people to other forms of mobility. People on the move are essentially motivated and affected by the knowledge and experience they gain though these global movements – as are the societies they move into.

Due to the complexity of the phenomenon, migration research at Faculty of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences is very diverse and cuts across many research fields including border studies, geography, political sciences, psychology, health, literature, linguistics and history. In previous years, faculty members engaging in migration-related research have conducted numerous national and international projects and have bid successfully for competitive research grants. The Faculty is an institutional member of IMISCOE, the international migration, integration and social cohesion network; it is the National Contact Point of the European Migration Network (EMN), the National Focal Point of the European Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) and home of the cross-border research network UniGR-Center for Border Studies (UniGR-CBS). Migration-related research is coordinated by the key research area “Migration and Inclusive Societies” (MIS).

Collaborators in Migration

Philippe
Van Kerm
Behavioural & Cognitive Sciences
Migration
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Jutta
Bissinger
Geography & Spatial Planning
Luxembourg
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Ingrid
de Saint-Georges
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Isabelle
Albert
Behavioural & Cognitive Sciences
Luxembourg
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Maria
Stogianni
Luxembourg
Migration
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Birte
Nienaber
Geography & Spatial Planning
Migration
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Léa
Lemaire
Geography & Spatial Planning
Luxembourg
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Julia
Wack
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Christian
Wille
Geography & Spatial Planning
Humanities
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Lucas
Oesch
Geography & Spatial Planning
Migration
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Ivana
Paccoud
Behavioural & Cognitive Sciences
Migration
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Helmut Erich
Willems
Behavioural & Cognitive Sciences
Luxembourg
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Rhea Ravenna
Sohst
Migration
Social Sciences
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Emilia
Toczydlowska
Luxembourg
Migration
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Sonja
Kmec
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Lorenzo
Vianelli
Geography & Spatial Planning
Migration
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Elisabeth
Boesen
Humanities
Migration
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Anne-Marie
Millim
Humanities
Migration
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Latest projects

Migration
Governing the mobility of asylum seekers in the European Union
The CONDISOBS (Contain, Distribute, Obstruct) research project explores the three key measures that were undertaken after the so-called “refugee crisis” to govern asylum seekers’ mobility in the EU: hotspots, relocation schemes and border controls. The main objective of the study is to understand the effectiveness of these measures to control and discourage “secondary movements” in the European context.
Migration
Cemeteries and Crematoria as Public Spaces of Belonging in Europe
In our multicultural North-Western Europe, cemeteries and crematoria gardens are places where different traditions and belief-systems need to coexist. But do they? 8 Universities, one of which is the University of Luxembourg, study migrant and minority cultural inclusion, exclusion focusing on cemeteries and crematoria as a highly sensitive ‘contact zone’. Called CeMi, this research project aims to identify and disseminate good practices.
Migration
Border Complexities
If border were once only perceived as markers of territorial relationships, this definition is no longer sufficient. The recent societal developments and the increased need for knowledge regarding their dynamics require a more comprehensive approach. This methodological shift registered in border studies, aims at describing and investigating borders in more complex ways. The University of Luxembourg launches a workshop focusing on border complexities to conceptualise and discuss them in a five-part series from different disciplinary and thematically angles.
Migration
The Governance of Reception Facilities for Refugees in Luxembourg: Local and Global Perspectives (REFUGOV)
REFUGOV deals with the governance of reception facilities for refugees (reception centres, refugee camps), with a particular focus on the role of local and municipal actors. The project looks at institutional settings, governance processes and their effect on the inclusion or exclusion of refugees, and on the subjectivities of refugees. Extending beyond the categories of global south and north, the case studies are Luxembourg and Jordan.
Migration
Evaluation of the Common European Asylum System under Pressure and Recommendations for Further Development (CEASEVAL)
Since 2015, migration to and within Europe has challenged the adequacy of the Common European Asylum System (CEAS). This has affected the implementation of both the CEAS and national asylum systems and called into question further harmonisation.
Migration
The European Migration Network
Since 2009 the University of Luxembourg has been the designated National Contact Point (NCP) for the European Migration Network (EMN) in Luxembourg. The EMN consists of the European Commission and National Contact Points (NCP) in each Member State and Norway. It was established by the Council Decision 2008/381/EC of 14 May 2008. The Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs coordinates the EMN.