Humanities

Humanities subjects investigate the way humans give meaning to the world. Their objects of study are the languages, social evolution, cultural production and cognitive achievements of humankind. Research in the humanities often focuses on cultural heritage, holding that investigation of the past is a precondition for coping with the present and thinking about the future, while maintaining a critical distance from ideological prejudice.

Within the faculty, humanities subjects focus on several areas of particular relevance today. One focus is social, linguistic and cultural diversity as demonstrated by individuals, evidenced by historical processes and/or represented in literature, the arts and the media. Many scholars in our faculty pay particular attention to the relevance of the media to cultural and social evolution. We investigate the way learning processes are influenced by multilingual and intercultural contexts as well as by new media, and reflect on the meaning of knowledge in knowledge-based societies.

Scholarship in the humanities is highly self-reflective and based on sound methods such as source criticism, historical reasoning, conceptual analysis and interpretation, but at the same time open to social and other sciences as well as to the application of modern technology. The humanities are therefore particularly appropriate for critical analysis of (hidden) power relations and the effects of social and cultural practices. They make their own contribution to assessments of ways society can deal with challenges such as the influence of artificial intelligence or the causes and effects of migration.

Collaborators in Humanities

Isabell Eva
Baumann
Education & Social Work
Humanities
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Mélanie
Wagner
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Martha
Fernandez de Henestrosa
Humanities
Social Sciences
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Dieter
Heimböckel
Humanities
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Carrie
Georges
Humanities
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Anne-Marie
Millim
Humanities
Migration
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Sarah
Degano
Humanities
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Katrin
Becker
Humanities
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Johannes
Pause
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Humanities
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Sonja
Kmec
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Heinz
Sieburg
Humanities
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Katrien
Deroey
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Sophie
Martini
Education & Social Work
Humanities
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Agnès
Prüm
Humanities
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Elisabeth
Holl
Humanities
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Gian Maria
Tore
Humanities
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Michel
Margue
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Constanze
Tress
Humanities
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Deven
Burks
Humanities
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Hélène
Barthelmebs-Raguin
Humanities
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Constanze
Weth
Humanities
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André
Melzer
Behavioural & Cognitive Sciences
Humanities
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Claudio
Cicotti
Humanities
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Jeanne E
Glesener
Humanities
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Christoph
Purschke
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Elisabeth
Boesen
Humanities
Migration
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Steve
Kass
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Lisa
Klasen
Humanities
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Floor
Koeleman
Humanities
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Hérold
Pettiau
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Sabine
Ehrhart
Humanities
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Andrea
Binsfeld
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Philippe
Poirier
Humanities
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Ingrid
de Saint-Georges
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Martin
Uhrmacher
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Oliver
Kohns
Humanities
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Ineke
Pit-ten Cate
Education & Social Work
Humanities
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Till
Dembeck
Humanities
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Sébastian
Thiltges
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Peter
GIlles
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Julia
Wack
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Christian
Wille
Geography & Spatial Planning
Humanities
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Gabriel
Rivera Cosme
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Hannes
Fraissler
Humanities
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Rachel
Reckinger
Humanities
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Georg
Mein
Humanities
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Simone
Mortini
-
Humanities
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Sven
Seidenthal
Humanities
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Marion
Colas-Blaise
Humanities
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Maria
Obojska
Humanities
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Claudine
Kirsch
Humanities
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Damien Francois
Sagrillo
Humanities
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Lena
Steveker
Humanities
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Koku Gnatuloma
Nonoa
Humanities
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Sandy
Artuso
Humanities
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Nathalie
Roelens
Humanities
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Tonia
Raus
-
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Dietmar
Heidemann
Humanities
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Amelie
Bendheim
Humanities
Luxembourg
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Diane
Kapgen
Humanities
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Niels-Oliver
Walkowski
Humanities
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Katinka
Mangelschots
Humanities
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Latest projects

Humanities
Exploring linguistic landscapes around the globe
Language in the public sphere offers a great potential for surveying the sociocultural diversity and linguistic dynamics of modern societies. The Lingscape project of the department of Humanities aims to document and analyze public signage together with interested participants using a mobile research application
Humanities
Self and Society in the Corona Crisis
The corona crisis has put a spotlight on the importance of science in modern societies. But not only medicine and the ‘hard’ sciences, also the humanities and social sciences are called for: which kinds of political rationality determine action in the global crisis? How does ‘Corona’ influence our understanding of borders, migration and international relations? How can we learn from the past? What are the challenges we face in organizing everyday life, teaching and research, art and culture, or in dealing with ourselves? And can digital technologies help us to compensate for the negative effects of the crisis?
Humanities
Using grammatical reflection to get a grasp on syntactic orthographic markers
Although the Latin script focusses on phonological representation, many orthographic forms
in French and German refer to syntactic, grammatical structures. These syntactic markers are not represented in phonology. Therefore, learners must acquire knowledge about these silent syntactic structures in order to spell correctly.
GRASP, a research project of the Institute for Research on Multilingualism from the University of Luxembourg investigates how explicit teaching of grammatical reflection enhances the spelling skills of grade 4 pupils in relation to orthographic syntactic markers that are not orally expressed.
Humanities
Sustainable Food Practices
The food systems in developed countries is far from being sustainable nor fair and Luxembourg is no exception. The “Sustainable Food Practices” research project of the University of Luxembourg wants to promote sustainable practices within the national Foodscape.
Humanities
Developing multilingual pedagogies in Early Childhood
A successful professional development track helped professionals implement multilingual education in early childhood in Luxembourg. MuLiPEC, a research project from the University of Luxembourg, enabled 46 teachers and educators to better understand multilingualism and language learning, and move from monolingual to multilingual practices.
Humanities
An app to promote narration, language development and multilingualism in schools
in 2013, facing the lack of specific or systematic programmes to further the development of multiple languages in Luxembourg, researchers of the University of Luxembourg turned to the Ministry of Education. Together, the institutions decided to address the need for the development of innovative didactic methods to manage and capitalize on the diversity and heterogeneity in Luxembourgish schools.
Humanities
Schnëssen – Crowdsourcing variation and change in spoken Luxembourgish
Luxembourgish is a young and growing language with a high amount of sociolinguistic variation that is currently undergoing a process of standardisation. The aim of the Schnëssen project is to survey this variation using crowdsourced data from a mobile research application.
Humanities
The Europe of the Luxembourg Dynasty. Governance, Delegation and Participation between Region and Empire
From 1308 to 1437, the House of Luxembourg ruled over a vast collection of diverse and scattered territories in the Empire. The LUXDYNAST research project aims to provide the first global assessment of the administration of this composite monarchy, the so-called Europe of the Luxembourg dynasty.
Humanities
Reading and Writing Literary Texts in the Age of Digital Humanities
The omnipresence of the image in our society distances us from reading and all its benefits. Thirteen partners in the LEA! group are relying on digital technology to encourage young people to return to reading and discover the cultural references that are essential to education and development.